My Piece Of The Pile

While Nuclear Medicine probably began with the Curies, Frédéric Joliot-Curie and Irène Joliot-Curie, as well as Marie Curie (mother of Irene), the true Nuclear Era began in Chicago on December 2, 1942. From the Wiki:

Chicago Pile-1 (CP-1) was the world’s first artificial nuclear reactor. CP-1 was built on a rackets court, under the abandoned west stands of the original Alonzo Stagg Field stadium, at the University of Chicago. The first artificial, self-sustaining, nuclear chain reaction was initiated within CP-1, on December 2, 1942. The site was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1965 and was added to the newly created National Register of Historic Places a little over a year later. The site was named a Chicago Landmark in 1971. It is one of the four Chicago Registered Historic Places from the original October 15, 1966, National Register of Historic Places list.

Reactor

The reactor was a pile of uranium and graphite blocks, assembled under the supervision of the renowned Italian physicist Enrico Fermi, in collaboration with Leo Szilard, discoverer of the chain reaction. It contained a critical mass of fissile material, together with control rods, and was built as a part of the Manhattan Project by the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory. The shape of the pile was intended to be roughly spherical, but as work proceeded Fermi calculated that critical mass could be achieved without finishing the entire pile as planned.

A labor strike prevented construction of the pile at the Argonne National Laboratory, so Fermi and his associates Martin Whittaker and Walter Zinn set about building the pile (the term “nuclear reactor” was not used until 1952) in a rackets court under the abandoned west stands of the university’s Stagg Field. The pile consisted of uranium pellets as a neutron-producing “core”, separated from one another by graphite blocks to slow the neutrons. Fermi himself described the apparatus as “a crude pile of black bricks and wooden timbers.” The controls consisted of cadmium-coated rods that absorbed neutrons. Withdrawing the rods would increase neutron activity in the pile, leading to a self-sustaining chain reaction. Re-inserting the rods would dampen the reaction.

First nuclear reaction

On December 2, 1942, CP-1 was ready for a demonstration. Before a group of dignitaries, a young scientist named George Weil worked the final control rod while Fermi carefully monitored the neutron activity. The pile reached the critical mass for self-sustaining reaction at 3:25 p.m. Fermi shut it down 28 minutes later.

Unlike most reactors that have been built since, this first one had no radiation shielding and no cooling system of any kind. Fermi had convinced Arthur Compton that his calculations were reliable enough to rule out a runaway chain reaction or an explosion, but, as the official historians of the Atomic Energy Commission later noted, the “gamble” remained in conducting “a possibly catastrophic experiment in one of the most densely populated areas of the nation!”

Operation of CP-1 was terminated in February 1943. The reactor was then dismantled and moved to Red Gate Woods, the former site of Argonne National Laboratory, where it was reconstructed using the original materials, plus an enlarged radiation shield, and renamed Chicago Pile-2 (CP-2). CP-2 began operation in March 1943 and was later buried at the same site, now known as the Site A/Plot M Disposal Site.

Significance and commemoration

The site of the first man-made self-sustaining nuclear fission reaction received designation as a National Historic Landmark on February 18, 1965. On October 15, 1966, which is the day that the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 was enacted creating the National Register of Historic Places, it was added to that as well. The site was named a Chicago Landmark on October 27, 1971. A small graphite block from the pile is on display at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, another can be seen at the Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, NM. The old Stagg Field plot of land is currently home to the Regenstein Library at the University of Chicago. A Henry Moore sculpture, Nuclear Energy, in a small quadrangle commemorates the nuclear experiment.

As it turns out, several tiny slivers of the graphite, encased in lucite, were also given to friends of the University of Chicago (I assume that translates to big donors and such), and several have found their way to eBay.  A fellow Nuclear Aficionado found one a few years back:

This 25th Anniversary memento popped up on eBay not long ago and I paid dearly for it. However, there’s not much of this stuff left; all but a couple bars of this famously pure graphite went on to be incorporated in CP-2 and thereafter entombed in concrete under a nondescript field in Illinois. The eBay seller would only say “I do know that my grandfather worked on the building of the atomic bomb but other than that I don’t know much else.” I have a feeling that the human story could be interesting, but on account of the seller’s reluctance to share so much as her grandfather’s name and other “personal information,” there’s nothing more to say right now.

The momento is pictured above.

I had almost won one of these several years ago, but I was outbid at the last minute (darn snipers!) and I’ve been watching for one ever since. By some miracle, two of them came up for bid a few weeks ago, and I bid successfully on one identical to that pictured above.  The second actually sold for double the amount I paid, which I guess makes mine worth more as well.  It was slightly different, perhaps encased in lucite at a different point in time.

I’ll never do anything historical, but at least I can own a piece of history.  What better way to start a new year than to hold a connection to the past in the palm of my hand?  No, it’s not radioactive, and it doesn’t glow in the dark.

Happy New Year, everyone!

Advertisements

The Doctor Dalai Facebook Page!

I owe an apology of sorts to my Facebook friends.  You see, Mrs. Dalai tried to get me hooked on Farmville a year ago, but I just don’t seem to have the agricultural instinct.  She has definitely caught the bug, however, and runs my farm, her farm, and a farm for both dogs.  Thus, my Facebook feed is full of dozens and hundreds of inane entries of Farm-vile related crap, and I’m sure I’ve been defriended by more than one disgusted reader.

It finally occurred to me today to do something productive to solve this dilemma, and so I created the Doctor Dalai Page on Facebook.  It’s not much more than a feed from this blog at the moment, but it does give me another outlet for commentary and other foolishness.

So, click “Like” below and become a fan!

New Years’ Notes

The most wonderful part of being the Dalai Lama of PACS is, of course, the amazing people I have met.  PACS is a business for the best and brightest, and somehow they tolerate me, too. 

I received this note the other day, and I pass it on with all due humility:

Dalai,

I am enjoying a rare couple of days of business-free family time, visiting my sister and my mother. One of my sons is also visiting.

In just a couple of days, I have probably gone through my online routine several times. First, check the Dalai’s blog. Then, check the AuntMinnie forums. And so on.

It occurred to me that I should write and thank you for your contributions, blog-wise. Over the years, you have delighted me, confounded me, vexed me, irritated me, gotten me so mad that I have cursed you. You serve up a pretty wide range of tastes, none of them bland.

I am politically pretty far to the left, and I have these same reactions when I read the editorial pages of The Wall Street Journal. And guess what? I buy the Journal every time I have the time to read it, mostly when I fly.

So, to one of my favorite bloggers: Thank you, Dr. Dalai, for your contributions, and for the continuing delight (and other reactions) that you give me.

My best regards to you and Mrs. Dalai, and may 2011 shower abundant blessings on the Dalai clan.

All the best…

As I have said countless times, I never cease to be amazed that anyone even reads the drivel I post.  I’m left speechless.  If I’ve brightened the day of at least one reader, or at least made him or her think about something, then it’s all worthwhile. 

Not to be lost in the melancholy of the moment, allow me to return to my more ascerbic self.

Email also brought me this unsolicited advertisement for a little PACS company that I won’t name:

Hello Dr. Dalai,

Sorry you missed us at RSNA. If you really want something new and different please read. We can out perform Life Image in every way. We are looking for luminary accounts let me know if you have an interest.

It has been brought to my attention that a new and different way to see images from anywhere on any computer is needed. Even though most PACS vendors provide a physician portal the truth is most physicians will not use it for a variety of reasons. Hospitals also have a problem dealing with CD’s. It is time consuming to make them and they sometimes cannot be read even if a viewer is available. If this sounds familiar please review the alternative solution from XX. I would like to discuss how we can help resolve these problems so please respond to this email and let’s talk.

Do You Need An Alternative to Sending out CD/DVDs

Do You Need a Simple Easy Way For Your Referring Doctors To See Their Images And Reports

Do You Need A PACS But Don’t Have The Capital Funds or Personnel To Support It.

Now There Is A Way You Only Pay A One Time Use Fee Per Study.

No On Site Hardware or Software Needed, Just An Internet Connection.

Please Read Below:

PACS, RIS and Image Sharing Across Communities

The XX supports the same image interpretation and reporting as a state-of-the-art web-based PACS. In addition, it enables image communications over the Internet for on-the-fly referring physician reporting, remote consultations, trauma transfers and more—without any dedicated software or hardware requirements for remote users. As a result, it is a highly effective image communication hub for Regional Health Information Organizations (RHIOs) or entire unaffiliated medical communities, providing an important step towards universal access to healthcare information. With appropriate permissions, multiple users in disparate locations simultaneously may schedule a patient visit, check exam status, access any study, interpret an image and obtain a report.

Lightning Fast 3D/4D Remote Processing

At the same time, XX’s lightning fast 3D/4D processing overcomes the challenge of formatting and delivering interactive high volume 3D/4D reconstructed images over the Internet on-demand. XX, for example, displays the latest 4D 320-slice CT scan output comprising 6700 images (3.35GB data) in seconds, by contrast to hours using conventional PACS and 3D processing solutions. Sites with an existing PACS can seamlessly integrate this functionality into their systems, and any site can take advantage of new revenue channels for advanced visualization without incurring a capital expense.

Taking Advantage of Computer Game Technology

At the heart of XX’s unique capabilities are Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), the same technology that powers today’s advanced video gaming cards. These GPUs are made up of hundreds of small processors that handle information simultaneously, in contrast to the single central processing unit (CPU) of a typical PACS server.

“XX’s artificial intelligence algorithms running on GPU technology make XX servers thinking machines. They are capable of producing XX™ and adapted to handle the ever-increasing volumes of medical data—100 times more powerful than current PACS servers,” notes XX, president and founder of XX.

One-time Fee-Per Study

With XX, any site, whatever its size and budget, can enjoy the most advanced digital imaging workflow without system set up costs and only a reasonable one-time per-study fee. “Hardware and software capital expenses, IT staffing and physical workspace no longer are barriers to the most advanced digital imaging applications and integrated PACS/RIS workflow,” explained XX.

He notes that getting started is easy, whether XX is implemented as a first-time conversion to a digital imaging environment, a cost-effective replacement for an existing PACS, or an added advanced visualization processing engine.

The XX supports authenticated access, encrypted communication, data and access redundancy and unlimited storage for the highest level of data safety and security. XX cloud-based advanced clinical viewing software has been cleared as a diagnostic device by the FDA,

Sounds intriguing to a degree, although the talk of being “100 times more powerful than current PACS servers” seems a little over the top.  How do you measure the power of a PACS server?  Processor speed?  RAM?  Probably the most important factor is the communications network, which has little to do with the PACS server itself. 
Unfortunately, XX went on to post similar information as a comment on my recent lifeIMAGE article.  That’s a no-no.

There are a lot of PACS systems out there.  Many die off from lack of funding, some scrape by in competition with the big players, sometimes buoyed by customers who can (or will) only pay for a bargain-basement product.  Doubtless there are some good ideas out there, and XX’s line suggests that he might actually have some innovations buried in the hype.  But caveat vendor:  too much hype spoils your message, at least if you are approaching someone like me who actually has some inkling of what you are talking about.  I’ve found that the more smoke and mirrors involved in a showing or marketing a product, the more likely it is that said product isn’t all that.

Words to the wise.  And by the way, don’t spam.

New Years’ Notes

The most wonderful part of being the Dalai Lama of PACS is, of course, the amazing people I have met.  PACS is a business for the best and brightest, and somehow they tolerate me, too. 

I received this note the other day, and I pass it on with all due humility:

Dalai,

I am enjoying a rare couple of days of business-free family time, visiting my sister and my mother. One of my sons is also visiting.

In just a couple of days, I have probably gone through my online routine several times. First, check the Dalai’s blog. Then, check the AuntMinnie forums. And so on.

It occurred to me that I should write and thank you for your contributions, blog-wise. Over the years, you have delighted me, confounded me, vexed me, irritated me, gotten me so mad that I have cursed you. You serve up a pretty wide range of tastes, none of them bland.

I am politically pretty far to the left, and I have these same reactions when I read the editorial pages of The Wall Street Journal. And guess what? I buy the Journal every time I have the time to read it, mostly when I fly.

So, to one of my favorite bloggers: Thank you, Dr. Dalai, for your contributions, and for the continuing delight (and other reactions) that you give me.

My best regards to you and Mrs. Dalai, and may 2011 shower abundant blessings on the Dalai clan.

All the best…

As I have said countless times, I never cease to be amazed that anyone even reads the drivel I post.  I’m left speechless.  If I’ve brightened the day of at least one reader, or at least made him or her think about something, then it’s all worthwhile. 

Not to be lost in the melancholy of the moment, allow me to return to my more ascerbic self.

Email also brought me this unsolicited advertisement for a little PACS company that I won’t name:

Hello Dr. Dalai,

Sorry you missed us at RSNA. If you really want something new and different please read. We can out perform Life Image in every way. We are looking for luminary accounts let me know if you have an interest.

It has been brought to my attention that a new and different way to see images from anywhere on any computer is needed. Even though most PACS vendors provide a physician portal the truth is most physicians will not use it for a variety of reasons. Hospitals also have a problem dealing with CD’s. It is time consuming to make them and they sometimes cannot be read even if a viewer is available. If this sounds familiar please review the alternative solution from XX. I would like to discuss how we can help resolve these problems so please respond to this email and let’s talk.

Do You Need An Alternative to Sending out CD/DVDs

Do You Need a Simple Easy Way For Your Referring Doctors To See Their Images And Reports

Do You Need A PACS But Don’t Have The Capital Funds or Personnel To Support It.

Now There Is A Way You Only Pay A One Time Use Fee Per Study.

No On Site Hardware or Software Needed, Just An Internet Connection.

Please Read Below:

PACS, RIS and Image Sharing Across Communities

The XX supports the same image interpretation and reporting as a state-of-the-art web-based PACS. In addition, it enables image communications over the Internet for on-the-fly referring physician reporting, remote consultations, trauma transfers and more—without any dedicated software or hardware requirements for remote users. As a result, it is a highly effective image communication hub for Regional Health Information Organizations (RHIOs) or entire unaffiliated medical communities, providing an important step towards universal access to healthcare information. With appropriate permissions, multiple users in disparate locations simultaneously may schedule a patient visit, check exam status, access any study, interpret an image and obtain a report.

Lightning Fast 3D/4D Remote Processing

At the same time, XX’s lightning fast 3D/4D processing overcomes the challenge of formatting and delivering interactive high volume 3D/4D reconstructed images over the Internet on-demand. XX, for example, displays the latest 4D 320-slice CT scan output comprising 6700 images (3.35GB data) in seconds, by contrast to hours using conventional PACS and 3D processing solutions. Sites with an existing PACS can seamlessly integrate this functionality into their systems, and any site can take advantage of new revenue channels for advanced visualization without incurring a capital expense.

Taking Advantage of Computer Game Technology

At the heart of XX’s unique capabilities are Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), the same technology that powers today’s advanced video gaming cards. These GPUs are made up of hundreds of small processors that handle information simultaneously, in contrast to the single central processing unit (CPU) of a typical PACS server.

“XX’s artificial intelligence algorithms running on GPU technology make XX servers thinking machines. They are capable of producing XX™ and adapted to handle the ever-increasing volumes of medical data—100 times more powerful than current PACS servers,” notes XX, president and founder of XX.

One-time Fee-Per Study

With XX, any site, whatever its size and budget, can enjoy the most advanced digital imaging workflow without system set up costs and only a reasonable one-time per-study fee. “Hardware and software capital expenses, IT staffing and physical workspace no longer are barriers to the most advanced digital imaging applications and integrated PACS/RIS workflow,” explained XX.

He notes that getting started is easy, whether XX is implemented as a first-time conversion to a digital imaging environment, a cost-effective replacement for an existing PACS, or an added advanced visualization processing engine.

The XX supports authenticated access, encrypted communication, data and access redundancy and unlimited storage for the highest level of data safety and security. XX cloud-based advanced clinical viewing software has been cleared as a diagnostic device by the FDA,

Sounds intriguing to a degree, although the talk of being “100 times more powerful than current PACS servers” seems a little over the top.  How do you measure the power of a PACS server?  Processor speed?  RAM?  Probably the most important factor is the communications network, which has little to do with the PACS server itself. 
Unfortunately, XX went on to post similar information as a comment on my recent lifeIMAGE article.  That’s a no-no.

There are a lot of PACS systems out there.  Many die off from lack of funding, some scrape by in competition with the big players, sometimes buoyed by customers who can (or will) only pay for a bargain-basement product.  Doubtless there are some good ideas out there, and XX’s line suggests that he might actually have some innovations buried in the hype.  But caveat vendor:  too much hype spoils your message, at least if you are approaching someone like me who actually has some inkling of what you are talking about.  I’ve found that the more smoke and mirrors involved in a showing or marketing a product, the more likely it is that said product isn’t all that.

Words to the wise.  And by the way, don’t spam.

A Note To The Mecca

Being an infidel, I can only visit Mecca through pictures, and it is a beautiful place indeed.  Fortunate are those able to make the haj to this Holy City.

Similarly, as a simple private practice radiologist out here in the boonies, I will never work in one of the medical Meccas.  You know the places I’m talking about, those incredible Bastions of Academic Medicine, the Shining Ivory Towers of Knowledge, the Shrines to Higher Learning, the Embodiments of Perfection, the Last Hope and the Last Chance.  May my friends and family (and I) never require your services.

Let me address the Mecca (it doesn’t really matter which one) directly. 

Dear Mecca, I have more respect for you than you will ever know.  But it seems that the feeling is not mutual.  I received a letter from one of your patients today, a gentleman who was very distressed with me based on things he heard from The Mecca.  And I don’t blame him.  Mecca, you told my patient that I and several of my partners had missed or misinterpreted a number of findings on his radiographs.  He was very angry, having been told by The Mecca that his disease could have been arrested earlier, but for our error.  Which of course would never have happened at The Mecca. 

Well, Mecca, I have had the chance to review the images in question.  Something is wrong.  There was no miss, no failure.  The lesion the gentleman stated clearly that you pointed out to him in a particular spot is nowhere to be found on his images.  Mecca, we have a problem. 

Ill patients, especially those who desperately seek help from The Mecca, are almost by definition scared and anxious.  I’ll certainly grant the possibility that the gentleman in question didn’t hear or didn’t understand what he heard from The Mecca, but frankly, some of the specifics are so, well, specific, that I really have trouble accepting that explanation. I have to take my patient at his word, and assume you did tell him these things.  Was this to make you feel good about yourself at the expense of some nameless, faceless doc out in the boonies?  I can’t imagine that you would sink so low.  Unless, of course, you are attempting to justify the metastasis of Mecca Medicine throughout the land, one patient at a time.  We’ve heard the claims from The Meccas over the years that simple radiologists like me aren’t up to the job.  Are you trying to spread the Gospel of The Mecca via the patients who seek your help?  Is that what I’m up against?

I confess to you, Dear Mecca, that I’m human, and I make mistakes in this business, as does every other radiologist who has ever read more than one examination.  I’m sure there are some mistakes made even at The Mecca.  In this particular gentleman’s case, we did not make a mistake, and you haven’t done him any good by implying that I did.  Please, I beg of you, measure your words carefully when you talk with your patients.  They hang on everything you say, as if it meant life itself.  Which to them, it does.

And to the gentleman himself, whom is no doubt Internet-savvy and may be perusing this message as we speak, I have this to say:  The goal of everyone in this business, whether they are at The Mecca or in the boonies, is to keep you healthy.  You, the patient, are the most important person we deal with.  We all try our best.  Sometimes that isn’t enough, and we will always keep trying to do better.  I do hope you received the finest of care from The Mecca, and while I disagree with their interpretation of your images, I still have respect for them, for your sake more than mine.  I wish you a full recovery, and happiness and good health for many years to come. 

Salaam alaikum.

RSNA 2010: Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something….Green

For my final installment on RSNA 2010, I’m going to tie up a number of product observations into one rather large knot.  Hopefully it will all make sense in the end.

The software I’m going to discuss is in part stuff I’ve reviewed before, hence, something old.  There are some differences and enhancements here and there (something new) and some features that seem to cross vendor lines, although I’m sure they aren’t really something borrowed.  And something green, well… that would of course refer to the larGE vendor that likes that color, which coincidentally is also my favorite.

After dabbling with the Discovery 670 SPECT/CT and the Xeleris station, I wandered over to the PACS-ville neighborhood of GE City at McCormick.  I met with some old friends, and made some new acquaintances.  I have to tell you, I really like the people at GE, especially those I have known from their previous lives.  These are good folks, and they are dedicated to releasing a decent product.  Which they will eventually. 

GE is still showing, and perhaps finally shipping, seven years after introduction, an integration of the Advantage Workstation to Centricity PACS.  AW Server, like pizza, is sold by the slice, with server configurations able to handle 8, 16, or 30 thousand concurrent sections.  Beyond this, one has to add more servers which are load-balanced.  Manipulation is then performed right in your Centricity 3.3 (or was that 3.2?) PACS window.  Very nice. 

Centricity 4, the latest version of the RA 1000 client, was on display, and it has some substantial improvements.  First, it is skinned in dark grey, much easier on the eye in a dark room than its predecessors.  It has the “SNAP!” tool (no, this is not a substitute for saying a dirty word) which basically is a tiny viewport pallette that appears upon double-clicking, and allows for image manipulation.  It is supposed to eliminate some back-and-forth to the toolbar, and I think it would be helpful after being used enough to become intuitive.  This component appears to be a direct port from the Dynamic Imaging Integradweb.  There is native MPR, and 3D images can be built into a hanging protocol.  But when I asked how many measurements could be displayed on an image, I was saddened to see that this number remains at four, and only four.  Why would we want to see more than that, after all?  Sadly, there are some nasty diseases that manifest themselves with more than two findings on any one image, and bidimensional measurements of more than two lesions require more than four measurements.  That’s why.

It’s nice to see Centricity 4 approching the usability of AMICAS 3 from 7 years ago.  I’m sorry, guys, but if you were to look at other products, such as the very fine software you purchased a few years ago, you would see where you need to be. 

Speaking of IntegradWeb, it does appear to be fully functional at last, reincarnated as the Centricity PACS Web Diagnostic (Web DX 2.0).  I presume this will finally take its place as the Centricity web viewer.  At least, I hope it will, as the old Centricity Web Viewer is without question the absolute worst viewing software on the market, bar none.  Nothing personal, guys, but it is literally that bad.  Burn it.  Seriously.  I mentioned this to a GE exec years ago, which shocked him to no end.  Maybe no one else has let GE know just how horrid this program really is, which would be very surprising.  I still have to use the old Centricity Web, and it is as much an exercise in agony as one can find in this business.  Have I said enough?

If I were running GE PACS, I would personally ditch the RA 1000/Centricity front end altogether in favor of IW, but that’s just my own humble opinion.  I’m sure there are some legacy reasons for keeping the old Centricity alive.  Perhaps because there are a zillion Centricity sites out there that need care and feeding.  Oh, well.  I don’t run GE.  I don’t even run my house:  the two dogs have full control.

Let’s shift gears to some different software, that for PET/CT viewing.  One of the old DI crew has prepared some very nice software for this purpose, based on the IntegradWeb 3.7 platform, although it is not yet released for public consumption.  I had the chance to compare it to the two big names in this venue, Mirada and MIM Software (formerly MIMVista). 

All three programs have mostly similar features, which I would deem necessary and sufficient for PET/CT reading.  No, neither my Siemens Leonardo or the AW 4.3 have many of these features at the moment, although my soon-to-be installed Segami system will.  At least I think it will. 

When one reads a PET/CT, there are several machinations involved.  First, you have to match the PET to the (almost) simultaneously acquired CT.  This shouldn’t be a problem since the patient is scanned on the same gantry, hopefully without moving.  But sometimes they do move their heads or something, and it’s nice for the machine to automatically register the PET to the CT.  (Note that this same mechanism can be used to match a PET to an MRI, saving $5 million on a new Siemens mMR hybrid.)  If there is a prior exam, and there usually is, you have to go through the same conniptions to match the old anatomy to the new.  These programs can all do so by rigid manipulation.  In other words, we take the old study, and shift it, zoom it, rotate it, basically do anything but distort it, and match it to the new exam as best as we can. 

Now, the Mirada 7D program can go one further, and actually deform the old study, pulling a bit here and tucking a bit there, to provide a more exact match.  I was told that the MIMfusion 5.1 could do this too, although I didn’t have time to see this happen.  The DI, I mean GE prototype does not deform as yet.  This version registers via bones, the next will use organ margins for the match-up. 

All three can track a lesion from the old to the new study.  GE has the physician identify the border of a lesion with the computer creating an ROI, which is propagated to the new study.  The lesions are labelled, and a table created which documenting the change in size and/or uptake of the lesions.  Mirada and MIMfusion work similarly.  Mirada allows definition of a region via maximum SUV with subsequent edge-detection.  RECIST and PERCIST measurements are easily generated along with the table of other information.  MIM uses scripts to automate the workflow yielding automatic contouring for the lesions (PET EDGE gradient detection), again with manual definition or threshold-detection possible. 

Both MIMfusion and Mirada XD3 have versions of clinician portals.  Mirada is working on a rather nice feature, called Case Meeting, which encapsulates everything you need for a tumor-board presentation. MIM, of course, is working on the iPad/iPhone app, which is the reason I bought my first iPhone a few years back.  Their new version does a very nice job of displaying a fused study.  MIM also has access to cloud storage.

MIM has completely redone their interface with a new flexible layout and new icons.  There are multiple options on both for hanging protocols. 

The GE opus isn’t available yet, but both MIMfusion and Mirada XD3 can be yours today for something like half the price of a Tesla Roadster.

Frankly, I am very impressed with both companies, (Mirada was recently bought back from Siemens by its founders) and both pieces of software.  When I encounter this situation, I usually punt, and I’ll do so again in this manner.  Here we have two companies competing against each other, offering similar paths to the same end.  The obvious solution is for these two fine operations to merge in some fashion.  Their individual strengths could thus be compounded into a true killer-app.  I’ll take a free copy of each program for providing that suggestion.

In the meantime, I do have to close with a report from another great company, Calgary Scientific.  I was able to visit with their principals, who appreciated the warm weather offered by Chicago this time of year relative to what they had back home.  I don’t have a lot more to tell you than I did back when I wrote my iPad article last summer, but I got some more hands-on time with their products.   FDA approval for ResolutionMD, the client-server viewer, is apparently imminent, so it can be used diagnostically.  But the real show-stopper is Calgary’s ability to port ANY software to the iPad, iPhone, or pretty much any other device with the PureWeb platform.  This is phenomenal, and opens up a lot of possibilities. 

And there you have it, my experiences at RSNA in several divided doses.  Did I mention that it was bloody cold in Chicago?  There are ways to warm up, however, as Mike Cannavo, the One and Only PACSMan, documents nicely:

That’s me in the black with Mike and the AuntMinnie.com crew.
El Grande!  See you next year at RSNA!

RSNA 2010: Bill

Seeing a President of the United States in person is something you never forget.  I’ve managed to be very briefly in the viscinity of every President from Nixon on up through Bush I, and on Tuesday, I sat 12 rows up from the stage where Bill Clinton spoke at RSNA.  I suppose I’ll have to wait until GWB and even Barack Obama come to town for a book-signing or something.

Bill was paid $100,000 for his speech, and it was certainly the biggest draw ever at RSNA.  Special tickets from RSNA were required, and these were sent out separately from the usual thick envelope we all receive at this time of year.  (I had to have several other vouchers reprinted, and which included by mistake a second ticket for Bill, which I gave to one of my daughter’s medical school friends.  Don’t hate me; the kid was a big Bill fan.)  Entry to the Arie Crown Theater at McCormick was to commence at 12:30 P.M. for the 1:30 P.M. speech.  By 12:15, the line wound completely around the theater and almost to an exit, and I would guess there were at least 1,000 people waiting.  But once the doors opened, there was smooth sailing, and I landed in a rather good seat.  Of course, photos were prohibited, so I took one, along with everyone else. 

President Clinton has a lot of charisma, and knows when to bite his lip just at the right time to sound and look sincere.  I have to say, though, that the talk was rambling, and Bill seemed to stagger from one point to the next, sometimes not quite making it there.  He took a number of gratuitous shots at the Republicans whilst on the way to wherever, chiding them for wanting to continue the Bush tax-cuts which would “cost” $700 billion.  (I don’t think it costs the government anything NOT to take my money, but it would COST ME a lot!)

Ultimately, the talk was about the inequality of health care in the poor nations, specifically the dismal state of diagnosis and treatment of cancer in the Third World, and he is certainly accurate in his description.  Of the 8 million cancer deaths annually, 70% occur in nations that get only 5% of resources.  Powerful statistic.  But the talk became much more about blaming the rest of us.  We shouldn’t be asking about government vs. private control, he said.  The REAL question is are we going into the future, or staying in the present?  Sadly, the implication is clear:  only the STATE (as run by Bill, Hillary, Nancy, Bawney, etc.) can take us into the future. 

The world is unequal, unstable, and unsustainable as it stands, according to Mr. Clinton.  With that I agree.  But I don’t agree that it’s my fault, nor that we have to dump our healthcare system and throw all possible resources to the Third World to change this.  In MY humble opinion, what Bill failed to mention is WHY the developing countries are in such dire straights, and why simply throwing money at them won’t help. In large part, the problem is not as much one of resources as distribution. The Third World does not have an adequate infrastructure to deliver health care to most of its population, and that is due to the level of corruption often found there. We can ship over an entire cargo vessel full of needed supplies, food, medication, whatever, and weeks later, find much of it for sale on the black market, diverted from those who truly needed help. These nations must fundamentally change their ways before anything good can happen.

Of course, Mr. Clinton wouldn’t want to address that, because folks in the rest of the world (except Israel) can do no wrong, and we can do no right, unless we follow in lock-step with the Liberal Agenda. Left-leaning folks over here rend their garments over the horrible discrepencies between rich and poor in America, but it’s OK that some Sultan or former sargeant-turned-Colonel can live like a king (literally) while his people eat dirt to stay alive (literally). 

Yes, we have an obligation to help the rest of the world, but the rest of the world has an obligation to itself that it isn’t fulfilling.  When Bill wants to talk about that, I’ll be listening. 

Mr. Clinton certainly has put his efforts where his mouth is, and he was not hesitant to tell the audience about some of the great work he has done since leaving office.  And he has done a tremendous amount of good, far more than I’ll ever accomplish.  That level of gravitas and power comes with the title of Former President.  However, I’m a little peeved about his taking $100,000 of our dues money to more or less chastize us as he did.  I’m a little peeved at the RSNA as well, for that matter.  Was there some message the leadership wants to impart to us, but needed Bill to voice?  Are they really our advocates, or looking to globalize radiology, and hoping to average out radiologist incomes to a annual level way below what Bill got for his hour of lip-biting? 

Hopefully Bill will put our money to good use and donate it to a Third World nation.  Let him feel our pain, too.

ADDENDUM:  Rumor has it that Bill received $150,000 for his ramblin’ wreck, but that this was paid by some anonymous donor.  Nice.